What Are Seniors to Do about Coronavirus Concerns?

Coronavirus Concerns: Get 24/7 Chronic Care and Monitoring System

Coronavirus Concerns: Get 24/7 Chronic Care and Monitoring System

 

This is truly proving to be a once in a lifetime reaction to an illness! Worldwide we are witnessing quarantines, social distancing, food and supply shortages at grocery, overworked medical staff, shortages of medical supplies, and closed restaurants and shops. The physical, mental, emotional and economic impact of coronavirus concerns on all consumers and businesses will prove trying in the coming weeks. The most vulnerable group of people are seniors. Seniors in Nursing homes are not allowed to discharge. Visitation is significantly restricted. It is advised to not visit them at their homes if you are potentially exposed to the virus. Homecare agencies are being tasked with increasing their caregiving needs, however, they already have a shortage of staff before this! Visiting nursing agencies, who are attempting to provide that bridge of medical care to recently returning ill and seniors are being told to hold their visits for several weeks, or to discharge their customers entirely by family members.

 

This lack of monitoring for our most vulnerable is deeply concerning to professionals and to our loved ones! Remote monitoring of people is an option. Please consider the Electronic Caregiver’s Pro Health system. Pro Health is a comprehensive public health and safety monitoring system. Some of the reassuring features are:

-24/7 powering by Amazon Web Services and AT&T Wireless
-24/7 Health Emergency Wearable Pendant
-Monitored body temperature vital device and daily reminder
-Voice controlled virtual health assessment
-Monitored medication reminders
-24/7 physician on demand service-PocketMD
-Remote monitoring app for loved ones and professionals

 

Telemedicine such as Pro Health isn’t just a wonderfully convenient way to get the care needed, it’s also a way to slow or prevent the spread of COVID-19. Seniors don’t have to go wait for hours in clinics and ERs that are increasingly crowded due to the COVID-19 pandemic. They don’t risk catching COVID-19 from others – or spreading it. Pro Health helps them take care of their health. Electronic Caregiver® is right there with you, night and day. Those who need to know will be notified, and you will receive the excellent and professional monitoring that will give you true peace of mind.

 

This system is able to replace worry with care and is very low cost for the peace of mind offered.

 

Learn more about this system: https://agesafeamerica.com/coronavirus-get-24-7-chronic-care-and-monitoring/

 

Trying to contribute in small ways to keep our most vulnerable safe we have arranged a substantial savings on this system with Electronic Caregiver®.  Age Safe® America is able to offer an additional 25% off this product for all individuals or businesses who obtain this system through the process below.

 

Age Safe® offers an additional 25% OFF the regular price above.

 

Stay Calm • Be Proactive • Age Safe®

Shipped right to your door!

1. CALL 603-263-4720 for Director of Technology

2. Remember to use Reference ID#: LSM54461

3. Age Safe® 25% Discount Code:ECGSAVE25

 

 

Providers CLICK HERE to Offer to Your Clients

 

As always, we are here to help. Please feel free to reach out with any questions you may have!

 

 

 

Daylight Savings Time Homebound Chores

 

With all the other news, we seem to have missed the switch back to daylight savings time.

You may be at home more in the next two weeks so here are some action items to stay busy and stave off boredom! You can even get the kids involved, if they are home from school!

 

  1. Check and replace batteries in the smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. If the devices are more than 10 years old, simply replace them.
  2. Check all the light bulbs (inside and outside). Replace with LED bulbs if possible.
  3. Check your flashlight batteries and replace, if needed.
  4. Check your first aid kit and your emergency kit for expired items and replace.
  5. Replace your furnace filter and schedule seasonal service.
  6. Clean the oven and stove.
  7. Re-organize the pantry and discard expired items.
  8. Re-caulk the shower or tub.
  9. Clean out the dryer filter vent.
  10. Check out the following items in your car:
    1. Lights
    2. Windshield wipers
    3. Fluids
    4. Tire pressure
    5. Emergency kit
  11. Update your computer virus scanner.
  12. Review your homeowner’s insurance.
  13. Update the family emergency plan.

 

Let’s make the best use of our time around our homes with positive steps toward safety!

 

 

Stay Calm, Be Proactive and Age Safe®

 

2020 Western Regional OT Spring Symposium

2020 Western Regional OT Spring Symposium

2020 Western Regional OT Spring Symposium

 

This weekend Age Safe® America was a proud sponsor of the 2020 Western Regional OT Spring Symposium (WROTSS) in Las Vegas. The symposium is a collaboration of the Occupational Therapy Associations of the states of AZ, ID, NM, NV, HI, CA, and UT for professional development, networking, and WROTSS business purposes. Age Safe America’s Director of Education, Fritzi Gros-Daillon was present to network with leaders from around the country, enjoy speakers and meet attendees.

 

Representatives from all seven state OT associations and over 300 attendees have the opportunity to hear international, national, and local OT leaders at this conference. The keynote messages, delivered by Dr. Michael Iwama and Dr. Frank Kronenburg, encouraged professionals to take the world view and embrace activism, beginning with clients, local communities and expanding to national priorities. The event features more than 65 sessions. Tracks include: Behavioral and Mental Health/Wellness, Pediatrics/School-based, Physical Disability/Rehab/Adults, and Academics Leadership/General.

 

We are honored to be associated with such fine health care professionals and will see you all again next year!!

Keep up the great work!

 

 

 

 

Help Your Loved Ones Prepare for an Emergency

smoke, CO, voice

 

Fires can occur when you least expect it, leaving little time to plan your escape, so the time to prepare for an emergency isn’t when your alarm sounds. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), only 32% of American households have actually developed and practiced an emergency escape plan. Make time to sit down with your family to plan and practice what you would do in case of a fire or carbon monoxide (CO) emergency.

Consider the following tips when helping to prepare yourself and your loved ones:

1. Map it out. Begin thinking about a home fire escape plan by first drawing a map of your home, making sure to label each window and door. Identify two ways out of each room and walk through your home to make sure the doors and windows you’ve chosen as exits open easily. If your family’s home has a second floor, consider having escape ladders in each room. You can find templates online to help you get started.

2. Choose a meeting spot. After you have mapped out all of the ways you can exit, pick an outside meeting spot a safe distance away from your home, such as across the street, at a mailbox or in front of the neighbor’s home. Be sure that your family knows that once they are outside, they need to call 911 and stay outside. Additionally, explain it is important that everyone knows never to re-enter the home for any reason and to let a firefighter know if someone is missing.

3. Help your loved ones. Assign someone in your family who can assist infants, seniors or pets during a fire. The responsible person should be in good health and be able to provide the assistance needed.

4. Check your smoke alarms. Having working smoke alarms on each level of the home and in every sleeping area is key to having a safe home. Check that you have alarms properly installed throughout your home and remember to test all of the alarms regularly and replace them at least every 10 years. If you have children, consider installing a First Alert Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm with voice and location technology throughout your home, and especially in their bedroom. This alarm will notify your child of an emergency, distinguishing between a fire or carbon monoxide incident, in a human voice as opposed to a regular alarm. This is especially helpful if a fire strikes at night.

Studies have shown children may have an easier time waking up to the sound of a human voice rather than an alarm. Smoke alarms are designed to give early warning in case of fire, and making sure your home has properly installed and maintained alarms is the best defense against one, said Tarsila Wey, director of marketing for First Alert. As far as CO is concerned, the only way to detect this fatal gas is with a CO alarm, so have one installed on each level of the home and near every sleeping area.

5. Plan. Practice. Repeat. Once your escape plan is finalized, your job is not done. Gather your family together and put your plan in action. Practice this plan at least twice a year, so if disaster strikes, your family will feel confident in their ability to exit the home safely. To make the drills as realistic as possible, conduct them both during the day and at night. Planning ahead can save a life, added Wey. Talk with your family to make a plan that fits all of your needs. For more information about escape planning and fire safety tools, visit www.firstalert.com.

Factors Contributing to the Risk of Falling

 

Many falls are preventable, but prevention is contingent upon your understanding of the factors placing an individual at risk of falling.

 

Factors contributing to the risk of falling are internal (physical and medical) as well as external (environmental) factors that could cause an older adult to fall.

 

Internal Factors – Many older adults experience:

– changes in their muscles and bones, weakness or loss of strength;

– vision changes, such as adjusting to lightness and darkness, sensitivity to glare, and/or decreasing depth perception;

– balance problems, automatic reflexes weakening;

– cardiovascular (heart) difficulties, which can often lead to numbness in the limbs, or loss of blood to the brain, which can cause fainting;

– medications that can affect their judgment and coordination;

– chronic and acute diseases (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, arthritis), which a fall can reveal;

– depression and/or sleep deprivation, making them less alert.

 

External Factors – An older adult’s environment or circumstances can also increase the likelihood of falling, including:

– clutter, unclear walkways, or lack of support systems, such as railings;

– slippery floor surfaces;

– lack of proper lighting;

 

Transitioning from another setting (such as their home, independent living apartment, or from the hospital) can also be stressful, especially for those living with dementia, as older adults figure out their new surroundings and daily routines.

 

Some risk factors considered to have a high association with falls, which are also modifiable, include:

  • the fear of falling
  • limitations in mobility and undertaking the activities of daily living
  • impaired walking patterns (gait)
  • impaired balance
  • visual impairment
  • reduced muscle strength
  • poor reaction times
  • use of multiple medications specifically benzodiazepines, antidepressants, anti-psychotics and psychoactive medications

 

 

Need Help to ensure your safety or the safety of a family member?

 

If you are a senior or caregiver please use the form to the right>>>

Check “Need Services Referral” and be very specific as to what services you or your loved one needs, and where exactly you or they currently live (city, state, zip code). We will attempt to match you with a qualified professional.

Or Visit our REGISTRY page:

 

 

 

Avoid Charity Scams During Holidays

 

Charitable giving is a significant part of many people’s lives and budgets and individuals are often eager to give back and lend a helping hand to those in need. Unfortunately, not every organization seeking a donation is exactly what it claims to be. If you’re not careful, you could wind up losing your well-intentioned money to a scam.

 

Don’t let the threat of scammers keep you from supporting the causes you care about. By staying educated and informed about charity cons, you will be prepared to spot a scam and avoid falling victim to fraud.

 

Recognizing common scam periods

While scams and other ploys can arise at any time, they often increase while emotions are running high — like near the holidays or following a natural disaster — when people let their guard down and are eager to support those in need.

 

Such scams may request donations from you over the phone, through the mail, via email or even on social media. They might include charity names that are very similar to legitimate charities, or even mention recent genuine emergency relief efforts. Their goal is to look as authentic as possible in hopes of tricking you. Some of them are very convincing, but you can protect yourself with these fraud awareness tips from Western Union.

 

Take your time

Be wary of any sense of urgency to donate. Scammers will try to work quickly, urging you to donate before you find any holes in their story. “If you get a phone call where someone is wanting a donation, don’t act right away. Do your research and donate to a recognized charity,” advised Western Union Senior Manager of Anti-Fraud Operations John Skoglund. Remember, authentic charities won’t push you for an immediate response, and will be happy to accept a donation at any time.

 

Don’t Respond to Emails or Phone Calls

Scammers may try to steal your donations by creating fake charities or impersonating an organization you’ve donated to in the past. There are many ways to do this; they might scour your social media accounts to find causes you’re sympathetic to or create a fake organization with a name that’s similar to a legitimate charity.

No matter the scam, they may try to solicit your donations via email or over the phone. Even if you think you know the organization that’s contacting you doesn’t mean it’s not a well-disguised criminal.

Don’t respond to email or phone solicitations, and avoid clicking unverified links or downloading attachments. Instead, go directly to a legitimate charity’s website to find the right donation channels.

 

Do your research

Want to verify if a charity is legitimate and if your donations will be tax-deductible? You can start with the IRS list of tax-exempt organizations. If a charity has registered with the IRS as a 501(c)(3), you will find them here.

 

Don’t be afraid to ask for details about an organization. The charity should happily provide them. You can also find a third-party source for information such as Charity Navigator or the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance. If the group that contacted you isn’t recognized as a charity by any of these organizations, you should exercise extra caution and think twice before donating.

 

You can do further research to find out how charities will spend your money and how well they support their mission. Websites like CharityWatch and GiveWell provide ratings and information on charities nationwide.

 

Pay Using Secure Methods

If a charity is demanding specific payment types like cash or demanding unusual forms of payment like gift cards, this is a red flag. Legitimate charities should be able to accept multiple forms of payment.

 

You should always pay in a manner that makes sense for you – but keep in mind that credit card payments offer more security than debit cards, checks, or cash. That’s because credit cards aren’t tied to your bank account and have specific protections under the Fair Credit Billing Act. 

 

Avoid Sharing Personal Information

Never share sensitive information like Social Security Numbers or bank account numbers. Even common data like your name, email address, and home address can be used to steal your identity or run further scams, so guard your information carefully. You should only share your personal info with legitimate organizations that take data security seriously.

 

The friends and family rule

Only use money transfers to send money to friends and family. Never send money to someone you have not met in person, and never share your banking or credit card information. Legitimate charities will never ask for donations to be sent to an individual through a money transfer service.

 

Be cautious of email links

Some donation requests may come through emails that house fraudulent links taking you to look-a-like websites. These websites have phony donation pages where fraudsters can capture your personal and financial information. Instead of clicking on links in a donation request email, open a new browser window to navigate to the charity’s official website and donate there.

 

Trust your instincts

Don’t ignore your own concerns regarding a charity’s legitimacy and never assume you’re “just being paranoid.” If you notice any red flags or feel uncertain about the situation, don’t donate. You may just be right after all.

 

Reach out for help

If you get a fraudulent charity donation request and you’ve sent them money via Western Union, call the company’s fraud hotline at (800) 448-1492 to report it. If the transaction has not been paid out to the receiver, Western Union can stop the transaction and refund your money. To learn more about scams and how to protect yourself, visit the Western Union Consumer Protection Center at www.westernunion.com/fraudawareness.

 

Watch Your Accounts and Credit Reports

Keep a close eye on your credit cards, bank accounts, and credit reports. If you see unusual activity on your credit card or bank account, you will need to report it to the financial institution immediately. And if inaccurate information lands on your credit report, it could be a sign of identity theft. Identity IQ offers daily credit report monitoring and alerts that keep you informed anytime your credit report changes.